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HS Forest Animals

Updated: Feb 2, 2021

Interest Area Changes to Environment

Forest Animals Twigs Leaves Grass Animal Tracks Animal Stamps Animal Stencils Pictures of forest animals in their habitat Birds Nest Feathers Magnify Glass Tweezers (age appropriate) Binoculars Bug Catchers Large Box (bear cave) Pinecones Acorns and Walnuts (be sure they are in an approved container so it is not a choking hazard Pipe Cleaners cut in pieces (worms) clothespin (bird beak) for a small group activity Fake worms

*****Camping Prop Box for Dramatic Play- Sleeping bags, Sticks, Maps, Backpacks, Flashlights, Small tent, Cooking utensils, Play food, Butterfly net, Logs made out of rolled brown paper with red, orange, and yellow tissue paper for pretend fire, Binoculars, Compass, Canteen, Paper plates, First-aid kit

Teaching Concepts for Large Group

1.  What animals live in the forest? Show pictures of these animals (baby – adult), animal tracks, and what the animals eat.  Discuss habitats (advanced language). 2.  What do the forest animals eat?  How do they look for food? 3.  What else is in the forest other than animals? (insects, trees, plants) 4.  How can we preserve (advanced language) our forest? 5.  What is recycling? What can we do in our classroom to recycle and reuse? 6.  Go into detail about the animals in the forest and have facts on each animal.  Chart what the favorites. 7.  How do trees look?  Discuss bark, leaves, etc.  How do the trees change with the seasons?  What products to trees give (oxygen, nuts, fruits, etc..)?

Teaching Concepts for Small Group

1. Use evergreen sprigs as brushes to paint green tempera paint on paper. 2.  Do forest rubbings.   Place thin paper over a tree trunk, leaf or fern and rub the side of a paperless crayon over the paper. 3.  Make a fishing game using a pole with a magnet on a string. Let your children fish in a pretend forest stream.  Write numbers, letters, words, etc.. on the fish and have the children tell you what it says. 4.  Roll down the sides of a brown paper bag and have children glue some feathers, leaves and twigs in the bottom to create a bird’s nest. 5.  Stick toothpicks in a glob of brown play dough to make simple porcupines.  Ask questions like how many toothpicks did you use? Are the toothpicks the same size? Why does this one look shorter, etc.. 6.  Make a tree puppet stage using a clean toilet tissue tube. Cut a hole in the middle of one side. Have your child glue on some twigs or leaves, then place his hand up the tube and stick out one finger to become an owl, bird or squirrel living in the tree. 7.  WOODPECKER COUNTING - Have children pretend they are in a forest listening to a woodpecker peck on trees to find its dinner.  Pretend to be the woodpecker and “peck” by clapping your hands behind your back.  Have your children count the number of pecks (claps) the woodpecker makes. 8.  Let children think of words to describe the following forest animals. Have them take turns completing the sentences below. 9.  Use the pipe cleaner pieces and clothespins and have children use small motor skills to catch the worm using the clothespin. A porcupine is as prickly as a ________. A deer is as quiet as a ________. A rabbit is as soft as a ________. A moose is as big as a ________. A woodpecker is as noisy as a ________.

Teaching Concepts for Music Movement Wellness IMIL

1.  IN THE FOREST Tune: “The Farmer In The Dell” Trees grow in the forest. Trees grow in the forest. With bark and roots and sap and cones, Trees grow in the forest. Animals live in the forest. Animals live in the forest. In logs and nests and hollow trees, Animals live in the forest. 2.  MARY WENT INTO THE FOREST Tune: “The Bear Went Over The Mountain” Mary went into the forest, Mary went into the forest, Mary went into the forest, To see what she could see. She saw a big black bear. She saw a big black bear. She saw a big black bear Hiding behind a tree. Johnny went into the forest, Johnny went into the forest, Johnny went into the forest, To see what he could see. He saw a feathery owl. He saw a feathery owl. He saw a feathery owl. Sitting up in a tree. Heather McPhail (Continue with similar verses for each of your children. For instance; “He saw a little squirrel – running around A tree; or She saw a big raccoon –scampering up a tree.”)

Teaching Concepts for Fingerplays

1.  Five Little Owls Five little owls on a dark, dark night. Five little owls are quite a sight. Five little owls. Are you keeping score? One flies away and that leaves four. Four little owls as happy as can be. One flies away and that leaves three. Three little owls calling, “Who, Who, Who! One flies away and that leaves two. Two little owls having lots of fun. One flies away and that leaves one. One little owl and we’re almost done! He flies away and that leaves none! 2.  If You Are Ever In The Forest Tune:  ”Did You Ever See A Lassie” If you’re ever in the forest, the forest, the forest, if you’re ever in the forest, you might see some deer. With antlers on one, another might run. If you’re ever in the forest you might see some deer. 3.  Owl Tune: “I’m A Little Teapot” Owl in the treetop, (place hands around eyes) proud and wise. (hands under armpits; stick out chest, then point to head.) Here are his wings, (hands under armpits; flap.) and here are his eyes. (point to eyes.) Down on the ground, (point to ground.) a mouse he spies. (move fingers quickly) Up he jumps, (fly hands up.) and off he flies! (flap wing

Teaching Concepts for Outdoor Experiences

1.  Nature Walk 2.  Hide animal tracks while doing playground safety checklist.  When children go out to play they find the tracks and state what animal it is.


CLASS Concepts

Compare/contrast animal homes (in holes, under rocks, in trees, in caves, etc). Ask many open ended questions…”Why do you think that some animals make their homes in holes? Why do you think that birds build their nests in trees? How do you think they know how to build nests?” Discuss instinct in animals. Connect them to human instincts. If possible, allow children to look at a real bird’s nest. Outside Activity: Gather supplies for children to attempt to make a bird’s nest. Take a nature walk if possible, to allow children to help. Children can use mud, twigs, pine needles, grass, leaves, etc. to build nests.


Teaching Concepts for Distance Learning


Sidewalk journey

Need: Chalk

Using chalk draw a variety of pathways on sidewalk, pavement, or walkway such as: curvy, straight, zig zag or even curly. Have children to participate by drawing the lines and walking on it like a tightrope

Move, Play and Learn Animal opposite big and small, fast and slow

Brain storm opposites such as big/small, fast/slow, loud/quiet, wide/narrow, high/low, heavy/light.

In a big space: Move across the space that space starting with the first concept and end with its opposite. Example: players could begin by running very slow, gradually getting faster until they reach the other side. Or they can start by marching with really big body and, as they cross the yard, gradually become smaller until they reach the end.

In a small space: Instead of moving across the space play the game by staying in place. Example: Marching in place, begin with big march to small march etc.


Homemade music

Use old coffee cans, make sure there are no rough edges. Remove paper around can and allow child/children to decorate it any way they desire. Tape/glue lid in place and use this as drum. Create different rhythms, beats, or try to repeat sounds played from their favorite songs.

Take plastic two plastic spoons, dried rice, beans, sand or, beads. With a spoon place dried materials in a spoon place second spoon on top and tape together, children can color the spoons to their desire. Create different rhythms, beats, or try to repeat sounds played from their favorite songs. Use these instruments while playing 2.  MARY WENT INTO THE FOREST Tune: “The Bear Went Over The Mountain” Mary went into the forest, Mary went into the forest, Mary went into the forest, To see what she could see. She saw a big black bear. She saw a big black bear. She saw a big black bear Hiding behind a tree. Johnny went into the forest, Johnny went into the forest, Johnny went into the forest, To see what he could see. He saw a feathery owl. He saw a feathery owl. He saw a feathery owl. Sitting up in a tree. Heather McPhail (Continue with similar verses for each of your children. For instance; “He saw a little squirrel – running around A tree; or She saw a big raccoon –scampering up a tree.”)



Animal Walks

Show an animal card or say an animal and students move like that animal.

Keep moving!

Make up a dance routine to your favorite song.

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